Skip to main content

20 Inspiring Surface Pattern Design Portfolios: Interviews & Insights

20 Inspiring Surface Pattern Design Portfolios: Interviews & Insights

In this resource, we interviewed 20 talented surface pattern designers about their portfolio websites. They shared practical advice and useful insights about creating their portfolios. Get inspired by their designs and learn from their experiences.

It’s an excellent resource for any pattern designer looking to create their first portfolio website or update an existing one. These portfolio examples and interviews will give you the insight and inspiration you need to make a stunning portfolio for your pattern designs.

Illustration by Linn Warme

Melissa Donne

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Melissa Donne is an UK illustrator and pattern designer with a stunning portfolio website that perfectly shows her art style and delightful color choices. The website is easy to navigate and Melissa lets her art take the front seat with big and bold images everywhere.

mdonnestudio.com

Collaborations

Melissa Donne

Interview with Melissa Donne

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I think the branding and colour scheme really feels like ‘me’ which was really important to achieve. I wanted the palette to reflect my work but not be overwhelming and distracting, so the work could take centre stage.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
Ultimately I want to communicate my overall style, with many high quality examples of my work so visitors can get a feel for the type of designer and artist I am. However  beyond that I wanted to create a site that had some other resources such as a blog and freebies. These include for example Procreate colour palettes and some downloadable PDFS. I love to support other creatives where possible and share my experiences and tips of the trade so I really like having this offering on my website.  I also wanted it to be a one-stop shop for everything relating to my practice and business. So I have a shop section also, which isn’t a traditional commerce store but more a directory of places you can find my work online – either via third party art print sites, or actual collaborations I have done.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I use Squarespace and I would 100% recommend it. I love the clean templates – they feel really professional and slick, and also the are straightforward to edit which is a major bonus and time saver.  There are so many features in a Squarespace subscription and they seem to be adding them all the time. I’ve also used the support on a couple of occasions and found the team to be really responsive.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
I would say definitely focus on your best work (with high quality images – watermarked if necessary) for showcasing your style and aesthetic and to attract clients. If you have a password protected pattern library this is great for helping to protect your work from copying and keeping track of which clients are interested in viewing it (useful for following up to check if they saw anything they liked!).  I also think using a lot of mock-ups is key – it adds variety to your images but also is an excellent way to showcase your designs in actual contexts so the client can visualise an end product better.

Find more from Melissa Donne here mdonnestudio.com & instagram.com/melissadonnestudio

Linn Warme

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Linn Warme is a Swedish surface pattern designer and illustrator. Her portfolio website is filled with nature-inspired creations and designs that are neatly organized and easy to navigate. In her portfolio section, we can browse past collaborations and pattern design collections available for licensing.

linnwarme.com
Linn Warme

Interview with Linn Warme

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
The clean look lets my designs shine and take the front stage, while still feeling bright and colorful. I am also proud of how easily you can navigate through the website.
What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
My main focus is to communicate that I am a professional designer and showcase my work to prospective clients. I want them to get a feel of who I am, my style, and my technical know-how.
What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I’m using self-hosted WordPress with a theme called Salient. I like the look of it and I like that it’s not a monthly expense. It’s flexible and I can customize the look of my portfolio. But I do find it a bit tricky, and I am extremely lucky to have a very helpful partner to act as my tech support, without him it would not look half as nice!

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Think of why you are making a website and who’s it for. When you know what your target is it is easier to design with that target in mind.

Find more from Linn Warme here linnwarme.com & Instagram.com/linn_warme

Maria Rose Adams

Artist, Illustrator & Surface Designer

Maria Rose Adams is a USA-based fine artist, illustrator, and surface pattern designer. Her portfolio website speaks the same language as her art does, it’s fun with bright and happy bold colors. By browsing Maria’s portfolio you can get a great sense of her personality and creative expressions.

mariaroseadams.com

Interview with Maria Rose Adams

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
Along with being a visual artist, I’m a writer at heart. I’m proud of the copy on my website, which I was particularly thoughtful about.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
It showcases my work front and center, but I also want my website to communicate about the human behind the images. I enjoy getting to know people on a deeper level. It adds another layer to the art that I appreciate. I tried to display my art in its best light while also giving some more perspective on where the images are coming from.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I used Squarespace to build my website (and the many iterations that came before it). I appreciate how simplified the design process is so I can focus my energy on the copy and small tweaks to make everything feel more like me.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Start simple! My first website was a portfolio page with my logo and an about page with contact information. Over the years it has evolved along with me and my art. I found it really helpful to bookmark websites I admired from other talented artists. When I was ready to update my own, I referenced ideas that I thought worked well. It is a process that keeps unfolding with time – I’ll probably be ready for a refresh of my own in the near future – so let go of the pressure to make it “perfect”. Just get started with what you have and the rest will come.

Find more from Maria Rose Adams here mariaroseadams.com & instagram.com/mariaroseadams

Crissie Rodda

Illustrator & Print Designer

Crisse Rodda is a New Zealand illustrator and print designer with a lovely colorful art style. Crisse’s website does a great job of creating an inviting environment for potential clients to get in contact, by listing her creative services and also displaying past client collaborations.

crissierodda.co.nz

Crissie Rodda’s portfolio

Crissie Rodda

Interview with Crissie Rodda

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I love the aesthetic of my website. As a surface design and illustrator, being able to create something that is visually pleasing and interesting is at the heart of everything I do. And in my mind, is always worth the extra effort.

I’m also pretty proud of the fact that I put together my website myself. It’s helpful that I have a background in graphic and web design. It was also important for me personally to showcase and utilise my design skills as a whole. Plus it’s fun being able to flex other creative muscles that I don’t often get to use on a daily basis.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
My website acts as a hub for my creative business. It’s where I showcase my unique surface design and illustration skills, where I direct potential clients and collaborators to come and view my artwork, as well as sharing the things that I’ve been up to.

The next thing that I definitely want and need to add to my website is a newsletter and blog.  So I can go into even more depth about what I offer, what I’ve been doing, as well as sharing more about my artistic process. Especially given the ever shifting goal posts of social media algorithms these days.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I partner with Rocketspark for my website, who are an awesome locally owned and operated New Zealand web building provider. I struggled for years trying to communicate with larger overseas web platform providers, so jumped at the opportunity to support local business and talk to real people in real time.

I would absolutely recommend working with Rocketspark, who have been amazing to deal with from day one. Their customer support is excellent, their platform is beautiful and super easy to use. And if you don’t have the inclination or time to design your own website, they have a pool of talented web designers that can help you bring your vision to life.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Take your time researching platform providers. Recommendations are awesome, but I would definitely suggest having a play around and making the most of the free trials that most providers offer. Not all platforms are created equal and while some might work well for others, they might not be the best fit for you.

Think about what the main purpose of your website is going to be and how you want your customers to navigate through it. Do you need a password protected area for a licensing catalogue? Are you planning on adding an e-commerce element in the future? Thinking about these kinds of things in the early stages will help you choose the right plan for you today, as well as future proofing your website for the long term.

I’d also recommend planning out your website on paper first, before you dive into the actual designing stage. This will allow you to consider things like how many pages you will need, what you’re going to put on each page and how they’re going to flow and connect to one another. It doesn’t need to be anything too fancy, just a basic outline will help to make your web design time much quicker and easier. This is basic wireframe will also help to communicate your ideas more easily too, if you’re planning on hiring a web designer.

Find more from Crissie Rodda here crissierodda.co.nz & instagram.com/crissierodda

Michelle Vitale (Dollytoast)

Illustrator & Surface Pattern Designer

Michelle Vitale (Dollytoast) is an illustrator and surface pattern designer from Johannesburg, South Africa. Over at Michelle’s portfolio, you can explore patterns and illustrations with her imaginative and creative art style. There are two main portfolio sections “patterns” and “picture books” featuring two of Michelle’s specializations, splitting the portfolio into sections makes it easy for potential clients to navigate and find what they’re interested in.

dollytoast.com
Michelle Vitale

Interview with Michelle Vitale

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I am proud of quite a few things. I managed to tweak and personalize some of the pages myself (as simple as they are). I am proud of seeing my portfolio pages grow as I keep adding pieces – it’s so nice to see the growing body of work displayed on my own website. And I love the GIFS I made 🙂

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I hope that my website portrays my personality and brand (it is one and the same really). I want potential clients to immediately get the playful, child-like vibe my work is all about. At the end of the day, I want my portfolio website to drive sales and get me license deals/book work.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I use Squarespace and I would highly recommend the platform. I find it quite easy to use, and if I’m unsure of what to do, I can find so many Youtube tutorials to help me out. It is quite intuitive and user-friendly. The templates and overall aesthetic are clean and modern, but you can customise it to suit your brand aesthetic.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
My advice to designers wanting to start a website is just go for it! Most platforms make it super easy to create one, even for people that have no tech savvy. There are free templates or ones that you can buy, and you can simply edit the colours and add your logo to start with – it doesn’t need to be complicated.
Your website is only controlled by you (not by some tech company) which has its obvious benefits. Clients and companies will also be able to get the bigger picture about you and your services when visiting your website.
It can be daunting (I know. I put it off for a long time myself). Just start small and simple – you can always improve it later on.

Find more from Michelle Vitale here dollytoast.com & instagram.com/dollytoast

Lahni Barrass (Softly Studio)

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Lahni Barrass (Softly Studio) is an Australian Print & Surface Designer that specializes in delightful floral pattern designs. Just like her studio name her portfolio feels very soft and airy. Lahni does a great job presenting the artists behind the art, with images and stories we get to know Lahni and her creative process throughout the website. This makes for a very cozy and personal experience for visitors, which suits the art she creates that’s also welcoming and warm.

softlystudio.com

Interview with Lahni Barrass

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I built this website myself with no prior web or IT experience! It was a challenging and rewarding process that gave me the opportunity to learn new skills and use my creativity in new ways.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
My portfolio website is designed to attract potential licensing partners in the design industry. I want them to easily see my signature style and past collaborations and understand if I’d be a good fit for their projects.

I also love to support new designers through my resources and freebies page, and my blog/ journal shares insights, learnings, and real-life experiences about growing a small creative business.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I built my website with GoDaddy, and I highly recommend them! For beginners on a budget, GoDaddy is a fantastic option. Their plans are affordable, and they offer everything you need to get started in one place—domain registration, website hosting, email (which helps you look professional), and a beginner-friendly website builder that makes the learning curve much smoother.

I needed no coding knowledge; instead, you can choose from pre-designed templates that you can easily customise by adding sections from a list of options and your own images, colours, and content. The GoDaddy templates helped me keep my initial design uncluttered and easy to navigate, which is helpful for a beginner.

I was able to pick things up quickly and create a website I’m proud of.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Building a portfolio website can feel intimidating, especially when seeing established artists’ websites. But remember, their journey started somewhere, too! Your website will evolve over time, just like your art. My website is entirely different from the first version I published. The most important thing is to take that first step.

If you start with just these four basic pages, you’ll be winning. You can add more once the time feels right on your journey.

1. Home page: Welcome your visitors, introduce yourself and tell them what you do.

2. Portfolio page: Show your best work in a clear and organised way.

3. About You: Share your story, what makes you and your art unique.

4. Contact: Make it easy for potential clients to connect with you.

Don’t stress about perfection! Your website is a living document that will grow alongside your art. As you develop your skills and brand, you can always add more features and refine the look.

If you’re looking for inspiration, browse websites of designers and artists you admire. Take note of what elements resonate with you and translate them into your own unique voice. This will help you stand out from the crowd!

Find more from Lahni Barrass here softlystudio.com & instagram.com/softly__studio

Maria Galybina

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Maria Galybina is a surface pattern designer with a professional and visually stunning portfolio. With looping video of Maria in her studio, we get a fantastic first impression when entering Maria’s portfolio site. The portfolio focuses on showcasing Maria Galybina’s many collaborations and client work, which add to the professional feel of the portfolio.

mariadom.com

Collaborations portfolio

Interview with Maria Galybina

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
That my website has been made with the thought of a client’s experience. I’ve put myself in the other person’s shoes to make it clearer and easier to understand what kind of artist I am, what my values are, how I can help, etc.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
The style, my uniqueness, why I should be chosen for a project, what working with me looks like, and examples of what a client can expect from our collaboration.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
It’s been a long journey for me. So far, I’ve used 3 different platforms and each time I ended up looking for another one. I don’t think I’d recommend the current, because it doesn’t quite satisfy my requirement at present. Maybe next time it will be the one. The thing is we grow and change and get to know ourselves better and it impacts the way we want to be presented. Each website I’ve had was an exploration, a trial which I started with joy and curiousity. As I develop I seek to find a balance between enjoyment – benefit. I’ve found a working combo: I’m trying new ways to express myself as an artist and a professional on Instagram, where I can also test new approaches, products, be playful and then take that knowledge to my website and update it to better showcase my portfolio and expertise.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
I’d suggest thinking about the message you want to convey and the values it would communicate. It would also help to better understand yourself and your boundaries, as well as what you can offer to your future clients. I believe different things work with different people, so there is no one unified shape we all should fit in. Find what works best for you and remember to enjoy the process.

Find more from Maria Galybina here mariadom.com & instagram.com/maria_galybina

Sara Maese

Illustrator & Pattern Designer

Sara Maese is a Spanish illustrator, surface pattern designer, and GIF animator with a cute expressive art style. In Sara’s portfolio, her art takes the spotlight completely. What I love about Sara’s website is the mixture of illustrations, animations, and pictures from past client work. The variety of project types makes the visitor’s experience such a fun one, there is so much to explore here.

saramaese.com

Sara Maese’s portfolio

Sara Maese

Interview with Sara Maese

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I think the proud feeling I get from my website comes mostly from an aesthetic point of view. I really like the colors and the simplicity it has.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I am not trying to communicate something specific, I just want it to be very clear and easy to navigate for everyone (and from every device). It’s very difficult for people to stay in a website nowadays for a long time, so I just try to keep that in mind and offer a really clear impression of how my work is at a first glance.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I use WordPress and the Elementor plugin for the design. For me they are really easy and intuitive, so yes, I recommend them.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
I have the same advice for a regular illustrator or a pattern designer: to keep it clear and let the work have the mayor role in it. I think the design aspect of the web has to be very subtle in order to give the proper importance to the artwork.

Find more from Sara Maese here saramaese.com & instagram.com/saramaese

Ali Hooten (Coit Creative)

illustrator & Surface Pattern Designer

Ali Hooten (Coit Creative) is an illustrator & surface pattern designer based in Colorado, USA. Ali’s portfolio has a clean and simple expression that suits her patterns. You can navigate the website with easy and the organized and spacious layout makes for a great user experience.

coitcreative.com

Pattern design portfolio

Interview with Ali Hooten

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I am proudest of my SEO rating, as nerdy as that is, when I check the score and how my website comes up on Google. It has taken MANY iterations and tinkering with my website to get to this spot, along with educating myself and paying attention to certain tactics. That said, I am always looking for ways to improve and know it could be better!

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I am trying to communicate that I am a surface pattern designer and illustrator who licenses primarily to kid and baby companies with several boy and outdoor-sy designs. I feel like this is always evolving and I am always learning ways to make this clearer based on my conversations with clients or potential clients.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I used Squarespace to design my website and love it; it is so straightforward to design a website yourself. If I were a designer starting out, though, I would just use Adobe Portfolio (it is included in the Creative Cloud subscription if you have that). Squarespace is great when you need to start selling things directly on your website. If you just want a simple portfolio, about page (please please include an about page!), and a contact page, Adobe Portfolio is great.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
See the answer above

Find more from Ali Hooten here coitcreative.com & instagram.com/coitcreative

Jillian Anderson

Artist & Illustrator

Jillian Anderson is an artist, illustrator & surface pattern designer with a unique and bold art style. Her beautiful, intricate, detailed designs take the spotlight in Jillian’s portfolio, with large, bold imagery everywhere.

jilliannicholeillustration.com

 Floral & Handlettering portfolio

Interview with Jillian Anderson

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
For my website, I am proudest of the fact that I set it all up by myself! I am not naturally a very tech savvy person and I wanted to try to make my website stand out as very ME, which I feel is kind of difficult if you don’t have a lot of web-design knowledge. Squarespace makes this easy, in my opinion – and it is a free template, so it was not expensive either.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I have quite a few things I’m trying to communicate with my website – but the main one is that I am an artist creating patterns and surface designs for other companies’ products. I have a small blog on my website and will also have a shop soon as I look at diversifying my business, but the main thing I want to communicate is that I am an artist who is making artwork for people to license!

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I use Squarespace for my portfolio website, and I honestly love it for portfolios. I have also used Shopify in the past, and I liked Shopify – but it was geared more towards having products to sell, and I think Squarespace is better if you’re focusing on a portfolio. I find it easy to navigate as someone who isn’t great with web design and felt like the drag-and-drop functionality was really helpful.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
I say DO IT! I have had a major stationery company reach out to me via my website – so it definitely is not time wasted. I also feel really comfortable having somewhere to send people when I pitch my work to companies. It’s sort of like a home-base, and I think it makes you look serious and professional to prospective clients.

Gerda Gruzauskaite

Surface Pattern Designer

Gerda Gruzauskaite is a Lithuanian surface pattern designer who creates stylized floral and abstract designs with vibrant color choices. Gerda’s portfolio layout is as polished as her designs, here we can find an extensive licensing portfolio that’s well-organized and filled with wonderful pattern designs available for licensing.

gerdadzy.com

Licensing portfolio

Interview with Gerda Gruzauskaite

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I love that my website is very simple – both visually and in terms of maintenance. I use a lot of my patterns as decoration on each page, so it’s very easy to update when I have new work that I want to highlight.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I wanted to make it as simple as possible for people coming to my website to understand who I am and what I do. I want my work to be the highlight of the website, and lead people to my licensing portfolio easily if they are interested in seeing more.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I use Squarespace and I am enjoying it! It’s really simple to learn and use, and they are constantly making improvements, so now their design capabilities are even better than before. They have some predesigned sections that you can just pick and edit with your content, which I often do as I don’t want to spend a lot of time on my website!

I would recommend it, especially to those who don’t need a complex website and don’t want to spend a lot of time taking care of it.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
I think my biggest advice would be not to overcomplicate it and let your work be the main focus of the website. Think of what you want to highlight about yourself and your work/services, as well as what you want visitors to do (visit your portfolio, hire you for custom work, etc.) and that could help you decide on the structure of the website.

Find more from Gerda Gruzauskaite here gerdadzy.com & instagram.com/gerdadzy

Katrina Snyder (Pretty Prismatic Art)

Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Katrina Snyder (Pretty Prismatic Art) is our next surface pattern designer. Katrina’s warm and welcoming drawing style translates seamlessly into patterns, card designs, and children’s book illustrations. Her portfolio features a fantastic mix of mockups, patterns, and illustrations available for licensing.

prettyprismatic.com

Pattern Design portfolio

Interview with Katrina Snyder

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
It took quite a bit of trial and error but I’m really proud of the fact that I think it clearly shows my personality as an Illustrator. My goal is the minute someone visits my site it hopefully brings a smile to their face as they’re instantly inundated with playful, whimsical art.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I personally am trying to communicate that I’m a prolific and diverse artist. I sectioned it off in several ways for ease of navigation and I think you can see the variety of work I produce while still maintaining a consistent style.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I used Ucraft. They’re very similar to the other drag and drop builders out there, were very affordable, and I’ve had a plan with them for quite a few years. There can be a learning curve no matter what builder you use, but really no complaints, it’s been pretty straightforward to use.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Take some time to plan out how you want to organize your art in a way that’s pleasing and very easy to navigate. Make sure to only include your very best work and work that you love, if you look at a piece and think it’s pretty good but you would do the colors differently now or you’ve moved to a different style…then don’t include it. It’s far better to have less work on your portfolio but have it really speak to who you are as an artist in this moment in time. And don’t forget to include your contact information!

Find more from Katrina Snyder here prettyprismatic.com & instagram.com/prettyprismatic

Vivian Hasenclever

Surface pattern designer

Vivian Hasenclever is a surface pattern designer based in Luxembourg. Vivian’s portfolio has a minimal and professional layout where her designs take the spotlight. Vivian’s designs are a joy to look at with her playful and polished expression.

vivdesign.me

Wallpaper portfolio

Interview with Vivian Hasenclever

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
Mostly I am just proud that I got it done!  It was on my to-do list for so long, and I kept pushing it aside. In the end, I went for a very simple layout and kept a white background to let the designs be the focus.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
My website is a short introduction to who I am, and a look at the kind of designs I create. My focus is on POD sales so I include links to the various platforms I sell on. I also offer non-exclusive licensing, so I showcase images of products that feature my designs.

Mainly, my website is a consolidation of the work that I do and a place where potential clients can contact me.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I used Squarespace, and yes I can recommend it as it is intuitive and easy to use.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
I think it is important to consider the purpose of your website but not overthink it. I spent too long thinking about my website instead of just getting something up. Once I got started it was so much easier to keep adding to the framework that was there. Also, it is certain that the website will be changing over time as I make new work or move in different directions.

Find more from Vivian Hasenclever here vivdesign.me & instagram.com/_vivdesign

Tess Belke (Almo Studio)

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Tess Belke (Almo Studio) is a Canadian pattern designer and illustrator. Tess portfolio is a great example of a website with a lot of warmth and personality, not only do we get a glimpse at Tess’s artwork, but we also get to know Tess as a person with short texts and family pictures.

almostudio.ca

Pattern Design portfolio

Interview with Tess Belke

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I’m most proud of the fact that I have a website! I completely understand the value of having a website but procrastinated setting one up for a long time – so just having one is a win for me! I also like that it is a clean and functional site. It has the basics I need, like a way to contact me, show my work and what I do, but isn’t too overwhelming or cluttered.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
My portfolio site is simple, but communicates what I can do for businesses and how they can get in contact with me. It was also important that the website communicates both professionalism and approachability, as I work with businesses of various sizes!

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I use Squarespace. I like it because it’s pretty intuitive and I don’t have to deal with coding. There is some functionality I wish it had, but overall I would recommend it.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Something is better than nothing! The best part about making a portfolio site is that it’s not permanent. You can always update or redesign it later on. It’s more important to have a site than to have a perfect site

Find more from Tess Belke here almostudio.ca & instagram.com/almo__studio

Sofi Grace

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Sofi Grace is a surface pattern designer with an elegant and professional portfolio site with a lot of gorgeous art to explore. What elevates Sofi’s portfolio (apart from her lovely designs) is the professionally taken pictures of her throughout the website, which adds a good deal of personality and warmth.

sofigraceillustration.com

Spring Bouquet Pattern Design Collection

Interview with Sofi Grace

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
When it comes to my website, I’m most proud of having a professional space to showcase my work. I made my first mockup website years ago, and it was a mess. The website I have now highlights my work, my professionalism, and my growth as an artist and entrepreneur.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?With my portfolio website, I’m trying to communicate two main things: my strengths as an artist and my availability for work. Although I tend to get distracted by aesthetics, as many artists do, it’s crucial to remember the reason why you made a website in the first place. I made mine to find future clients, so I try to make it very clear how they can connect and collaborate with me.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I used Wix to create my website, and I highly recommend it. I found it really easy to use, and it had every tool I needed.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
My biggest advice for pattern designers looking to make a portfolio website is to keep it simple and not overcomplicate things. Start with the basics! You can begin with just a home page and a contact page, publish it, and then add more later on. The hardest part is getting started! If it helps, feel free to use my website as inspiration as you craft your own.

Geetanjali Behera

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Geetanjali Behera is an illustrator and surface pattern designer based in Goa, India. Her portfolio does an excellent job of communicating her specialization and her strengths as a designer and illustrator. Throughout Geetanjali’s portfolio, visitors can see her extraordinary range of art styles and skills and the creative services she has to offer.

geetanjalibehera.com

Pattern Design Collections

Interview with Geetanjali Behera

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I’m most proud of the diverse and enriching content I share on my website. It showcases my surface pattern portfolio, offering a variety of beautiful and vibrant designs that reflect my technical knowledge and artistic style. I also provide online classes where I teach designing and selling surface patterns, allowing others to learn and grow their skills. Additionally, I have a dedicated section for my coloring book “Mindful and meditative coloring” that combines intricate patterns, providing a relaxing and artistic experience. Finally, my Thangka paintings, which are traditional Tibetan artworks, highlight my dedication to preserving and sharing this beautiful cultural heritage.

Each element of my website is crafted with passion and a commitment to quality, making it a true reflection of my artistic journey.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
With my portfolio website, I strive to connect effectively with the surface pattern industry. By showcasing my diverse range of surface patterns, I want to attract potential companies, makers, and buyers who are interested in licensing my designs or purchasing them via my POD site on Spoonflower.

If art directors or buyers like the small glimpse of my work, they can contact me to view my complete portfolio. This is how I secured my first licensing deal, so I understand the importance of having an impressive selection of patterns on your website. Additionally, I emphasize my online classes and 1-on-1 sessions about surface pattern design, aiming to help fellow artists enhance their skills and drive traffic to my Skillshare classes.

Beyond these primary goals, my website serves as a platform to display my skills and personality, offering a glimpse into my creative journey and artistic passions. This approach not only shows my expertise but also encourages collaboration and engagement from different people in the industry.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I used Wix to create my website and designed it myself. I found Wix to be quite easy and fun to work with, making the website creation process enjoyable. However, I can’t say which platform is best, as I haven’t used others to compare.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
I highly recommend having a portfolio website as it acts like your resume and introduction. Industry professionals are often too busy to view a 100-page portfolio without first seeing a glimpse of your work. While Instagram can be useful, and I’ve received many licensing and collaboration offers through it, many art directors and companies prefer not to view work on Instagram. It’s difficult to showcase your best work, and scrolling through an entire feed isn’t ideal.

If you’re unsure or not ready to invest in a platform, at least start with a PDF portfolio or an online portfolio using sites like Issuu. Additionally, make sure to classify your work into collections and themes, and always consider your target client or the company you are pitching to. Ensure that your work aligns with their style and needs.

Find more from Geetanjali Behera here geetanjalibehera.com & instagram.com/geetanjali.b

Lara Mascareño

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Lara Mascareño (Aralma Design) is a Venezuelan surface pattern designer and illustrator based in Spain. Lara excels in digital and traditional mediums like gouache paint, which we can see when navigating her beautiful and cozy portfolio.

aralmadesign.com

Pattern Design Portfolio

Lara Mascareño

Interview with Lara Mascareño

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
In the first place, I’m proud to have been able to create the website by myself and I’m also really happy with the cohesiveness of the overall look. I feel that it actually represents me and my work.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I want my style to stand out when someone visits my website. I want people to quickly understand what I do and how I can help them. I also want to convey professionalism so that people feel they can trust me and my work.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
My first website was built with WordPress, and I needed help to create it. I had to pay an annual fee for the hosting (around 120€). The website was fine, but I realized that I wasn’t using it to its full potential (I didn’t intend to have a blog or an online store on my website). So, after doing some research, I decided to switch to Adobe Portfolio. I just wanted an easy-to-use platform to showcase my work, with basic features like a contact form, photo gallery, etc and since I was already paying a monthly subscription to Adobe CC I decided to take advantage of it and use Adobe Portfolio, which was already included in the plan.

So far, I’m happy with the change. The platform is very easy to use, and I don’t depend on anyone to make any changes or updates. If you’re thinking of creating a website to showcase your work and already have (or are considering getting) an Adobe CC subscription, this is a very good option.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
A few tips if you are considering creating your first website:

  • Buy your domain now! Whether you’re going to use your name, the name of your studio, or anything else, the first step is to check if that name is available and purchase it. Then you can plan how you want your website to look.
  • Sketch out on paper how you want your website to look. Think about all the pages you want to include and what each of them should contain. With this ‘map’ of your website, it will be easier later to gather all the images you need and write all the texts.
  • Keep it simple! Having a website gives you professionalism and it’s highly advisable to have one, but if you’re just starting out, don’t worry because you don’t have lots of artwork to show. Simply select what you like the most from what you have (even if it’s little), and that will be enough. You can always update your website as you go.
  • You can use mockups to showcase your artwork. Think about the products you’re most excited to see your work on and create high-quality mockups.
  • Don’t worry if you don’t have a defined style. If you can work in various styles, you can create different categories on your website showcasing your different styles. The important thing is that your potential client understands what you can do for them.
    Last but not least, have fun! Enjoy the process, this may be your first website, but it doesn’t have to be the final one, and it certainly doesn’t have to be perfect. Do what you can with the resources you have at hand.

Find more from Lara Mascareño here aralmadesign.com & instagram.com/aralma_design

Seiko Sisco

Surface Pattern Designer

Seiko Sisco is a surface pattern designer based in Pittsburgh, USA. Seiko has a fun and playful art style that’s perfect for designs geared towards kids. Her portfolio is as bright and happy as her pattern designs are. Seiko does an excellent job creating a great user experience on her website. She uses a mix of mockups, products, patterns, and illustrations to make browsing interesting.

seikosisco.com

Pattern Portfolio

Seiko Sisco

Interview with Seiko Sisco

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
My website feels very ME and I feel very encouraged when others give me this feedback!

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I’d love for my visitors to feel instant joy through seeing my surface pattern designs featured on the website. It’s my goal to showcase my work front and center without many distractions so potential collaborators and art directors can easily see and feel whether my work is a good fit for their products. I also want to communicate my credibility as a designer through past and present collaboration examples that are sprinkled throughout the website. My ‘Portfolio’ page is still a work in progress, but currently I showcase a few patterns from each of my main categories just to show my style and breadth. For my ‘About Me’ page, in addition to sharing more about me as a person, I also treat it like a resume so if people want to get to know my creative journey, it’s all there in one place.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I created my website on Wix. I would recommend Wix if you want to build a website that is really easy to set up (simple drag and drop) and have total creative freedom on layouts etc. I have no background/training in website design, but was able to launch this website rather quickly!

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Don’t overthink it and go with the simplest and easiest option you have at the moment. (The reason I went with Wix is because I already had an e-commerce website for my handmade shop on Wix and was familiar with the platform). Start simple and know that you can change and update as you grow as well!

Find more from Seiko Sisco here seikosisco.com & instagram.com/seikosisco

Sara Torabi (Papillon Patterns)

Surface Pattern Designer

Sara Torabi (Papillon Patterns) is a surface pattern designer living in Canada. Sara has a neat and straightforward portfolio website where you can find her beautiful floral pattern designs and illustrations.

papillonpatterns.com

Floral Pattern Portfolio

Interview with Sara Torabi (Papillon Patterns)

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
Even though my portfolio is always a work in progress and frequently updated, the part where I am showcasing my licensed designs with indirect links to partner shops is the part I am really happy with. It not only highlights the type of work I am passionate about but also provides potential clients with concrete examples of my design style. By presenting these licensed designs, I aim to attract licensing partnerships and custom work opportunities, as it demonstrates my passion to create marketable and appealing products.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
With my portfolio website, I aim to effectively communicate the nature of the work I produce. By showcasing my projects, including licensed designs linked to partner shops, I provide potential clients with a clear understanding of my creative style. Ultimately, my goal is to attract clients for licensing partnerships and custom work, demonstrating my versatility and dedication to producing unique designs that meet their needs and expectations.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
There are many amazing platforms out there, and each one can offer unique benefits depending on an individual’s specific needs and preferences. The platform I am using is called Weebly. The primary reason I chose Weebly is its ease of use. Known for its simple, drag-and-drop interface, Weebly makes it easy for beginners to create and manage their websites without needing extensive technical knowledge. If you are looking for an affordable and user-friendly platform for your portfolio, Weebly could be an excellent option for you to explore.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
To create a portfolio to showcase your patterns I would suggest to opt for a user-friendly platform that supports high-quality images and e-commerce features. Select and display your best work, showing various applications with professional photos and mockups. Aim for a cohesive design with consistent branding and easy navigation. Add a personal “About Me” page with your bio and photo, and organize your projects with clear descriptions. Ensure your site is mobile-friendly, and connected to social media.

Find more from Seiko Sisco here seikosisco.com & instagram.com/seikosisco

Sara Rain

Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

Sara Rain is a surface pattern designer & Illustrator based in Japan. Sara is a talented pattern designer who creates beautiful digital patterns, often featuring detailed florals. Explore her creative work and enjoy the lovely patterns she has crafted.

sararaindesign.com

Floral Pattern Portfolio

Sara Rain

Interview with Sara Rain

 

What are you the proudest of when it comes to your website?
I’m proudest of the initial impact that my website has when you first open it as it immediately showcases my vibe and my skills. The viewer will instantly know what I’m about and what I can offer.

What are you trying to communicate with your portfolio website?
I’m communicating the type of work that I want to do (not that I can do, there are many things I can do but might not want to). I think the best piece of advice I was ever given when starting out was to create the kind of work that I’d like to be paid for. In all honesty, I haven’t updated my website in three years as I’ve been busy creating for clients doing exactly the kind of work that I have on my website and more.

What platform did you use to create your website, and would you recommend it?
I used Squarespace and I would recommend it as it’s fairly easy to navigate, even if you have no web design experience.

Do you have any advice for pattern designers thinking of making a portfolio website?
Yes! Think about the kind of work you’d like to be paid for and the kind of clients you’d like to attract. It’s better to be niche than to appeal to a broad range of people. You want to be the person that people come to and can rely on to get their job done.

  • You are only as good as your worst piece – only include your best work!
  • List the services you offer
  • Art directors are always looking for florals and occasions (Christmas, Easter etc.)

Find more from Sara Rain here sararaindesign.com & instagram.com/sararaindesign

Leave a Reply